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Recommended books

Recommended books: Explore our gallery of books. We invite you to share your reflections with us.

Gesher HaChaim, The Bridge of Life: Life as a Bridge Between Past and Future

Gesher HaChaim, The Bridge of Life: Life as a Bridge Between Past and Future

Rabbi Tucazinsky In this classic presentation Rabbi Tucazinsky explains the Jewish position that this world is merely a bridge that connects to the next world. The soul enters the individual before one’s life and then lives on to the next world (Olam Haba).
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My Shoshana: A Father's Journey Through Loss

My Shoshana: A Father’s Journey Through Loss

Rabbi Rafael Grossman, 2012 Rafael Grossman was the successful rabbi of a prominent synagogue, the president of his state's rabbinical council, and the dean of a Hebrew Day School when his teenage daughter Shoshana became ill. Shoshana, vibrant and energetic, a delight to her parents and everyone around her, died at the age of seventeen. After her death, Rabbi Grossman was sure that he would never regain his faith in God or his joy in living. But as the years went by, he began to understand how Jews throughout history managed to sustain hope in the wake of personal and communal calamities.  He penned this heartfelt letter to Shoshana many years after her passing, as an expression of his love, and his never-ending sorrow, but also of his sense of renewal. And the recognition, that with our memories, no one is truly lost to us.
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Please Be Patient, I'm Grieving: How to Care For and Support the Grieving Heart

Please Be Patient, I’m Grieving: How to Care For and Support the Grieving Heart

Gary Roe, 2016 Bestselling author, hospice chaplain, and grief specialist Gary Roe gives you a look at the grieving heart – the thoughts, emotions, and struggles within. If you’re wanting to help someone who’s grieving, you’ll get a glimpse of what’s going on inside them and be better able to love and support them. If you’re in the midst of grief and loss, you’ll see yourself as you read, and be encouraged that you aren’t as weird or crazy as you thought.
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Bearing the Unbearable

Bearing the Unbearable

Joanne Cacciatore, 2017 Organized into fifty-two short chapters, Bearing the Unbearable is a companion for life’s most difficult times, revealing how grief can open our hearts to connection, compassion, and the very essence of our shared humanity.
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It's Ok That You're Not Ok: Meeting Grief and Loss in a Culture That Doesn't Understand

It’s Ok That You’re Not Ok: Meeting Grief and Loss in a Culture That Doesn’t Understand

Megan Devine, 2017 In It’s OK That You’re Not OK, Megan Devine offers a profound new approach to both the experience of grief and the way we try to help others who have endured tragedy. Having experienced grief from both sides—as both a therapist and as a woman who witnessed the accidental drowning of her beloved partner—Megan writes with deep insight about the unspoken truths of loss, love, and healing. She debunks the culturally prescribed goal of returning to a normal, “happy” life, replacing it with a far healthier middle path, one that invites us to build a life alongside grief rather than seeking to overcome it.
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The Tincture of Time, Restoration After the Death of a Child

The Tincture of Time, Restoration After the Death of a Child

Marie Levine 2011 In The Tincture of Time, Ms. Levine reflects on the death of her son after a number of years have past, offering a reflective that she has learned from the passage of time.
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First You Die,  Learn To Live After the Death of Your Child

First You Die, Learn To Live After the Death of Your Child

Marie Levine, 2003 After the death of her only child, Marie Levine weaves the story of her own bereavement into a collection of essays, poems and writings that chronicle her own surviving mother's journey. As a nightmarish reality envelops her, Marie describes the ultimate restoration of hope and healing as she learns to live a whole new life she could never have imagined.
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The Jewish Way in Death and Mourning

The Jewish Way in Death and Mourning

For over thirty years Jews have turned to Rabbi Maurice Lamm's classic work for direction and consolation. Selected by The New York Times as one of the ten best religious books of the year when it was first published in 1969, The Jewish Way in Death and Mourning leads the family and friends of the deceased through the most difficult chapter of life-from the moment of death through the funeral service, the burial, and the various periods of mourning.
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Kayak Morning, Roger Rosenblatt

Kayak Morning, Roger Rosenblatt

This is the second book in which Roger Rosenblatt reflects on life after the sudden death of his daughter. Rosenblatt offers a poignant meditation on the nature of grief, the passages through it, the solace of solitude, and the healing power of love.
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Making Toast, Roger Rosenblatt

Making Toast, Roger Rosenblatt

 Roger Rosenblatt shares the unforgettable story of the tragedy that changed his life and his family. He shares how he and his wife move in with his son-n-law and young grandchildren after the sudden death of his daughter.
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I Miss My Baby

I Miss My Baby

Pnina Rosenstark We are proud to have published a new children’s book “I Miss My Baby” by Pnina Rosenstark. The book tells the heartbreaking story of the loss of an infant. The story is told through the eyes of the child’s three year old sister and touches on the tragic pain of the loss of a sibling. Get a free copy
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The Road To Resilience

The Road To Resilience

By Sherri Mandell, 2015 How do you grow from grief? How do the Jewish people continue on with strength despite all of the hardships they have faced? Sherri Mandell explores the seven spiritual steps of resilience that teach us how to not only survive grief, but how to thrive in the face of loss and trauma. Resilience is often misunderstood. In Jewish thought, resilience is not bouncing back, but is a process of becoming greater. This book will prepare you to enter the darkness of loss and experience growth, even when it seems most unlikely.
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To Mourn A Child: Jewish Response To Neonatal and Childhood Death

To Mourn A Child: Jewish Response To Neonatal and Childhood Death

Edited by Jeffrey Saks and Joel Wolowelsky  \  OU Press, 2013 This book is a collection of over 20 articles, which for the most part, present a personal account of loss. One hears different accounts of the experience of loss, bereavement and how people have dealt with their trauma and pain. The collection highlights personal responses from an Orthodox perspective. Many of the pieces refer us to sources in biblical and Talmudic literature. The book gives the bereaved reader the sense that he/she is not alone in the experience of child loss. We learn in reading this collection of others who have walked thorough the same ‘valley of the shadow of death’ and have garnered the strength to write about their intimate feelings and their deep emotions.
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The Fed-Up Man of Faith: Challenging God in the  Face of Tragedy and Suffering

The Fed-Up Man of Faith: Challenging God in the Face of Tragedy and Suffering

By Shmuley Boteach  \  Gefen Publishing House, 2013 This book argues for an approach to suffering which calls on us to confront G-d. Rabbi Boteach suggests in this book that learning from the role models of Abraham and Moses not to be silent and resign to ourselves to the fact that we suffer, feel despair and pain. Holding G-d accountable for pain in this world means that we believe in Him as an all-powerful G-d. Through an honest confrontation with G-d we do not diminish our faith, rather, we are empowered to do are part in making the world more whole.
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The Blessing of a Broken Heart

The Blessing of a Broken Heart

By Sherri Mandell  \  Toby Press, 2003 The Blessing of a Broken Heart is the true story of an American family who moved to Israel and were soon faced with the inexplicable murder of their son Koby, z”l at the hands of terrorists. In it Sherri describes the harrowing journey of the first year. This is a book of hope in a time of utter despair. With inspiring anecdotes about their son, Sherri inspires us as she begins to rebuild her shattered world. She teaches how one can find light and blessing in a time of great darkness.
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Beyond Tears: Living After Losing a Child

Beyond Tears: Living After Losing a Child

Ellen Mitchell  \  St. Martin’s Pres  \  Second Edition, 2009 Beyond Tears is written by nine mothers who have each lost a child. Each of these mothers lost her child at least seven years ago. They share with other bereaved parents what to expect in the first year and long beyond.
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Afterlife: The Jewish View: Where Are We Headed

Afterlife: The Jewish View: Where Are We Headed

By, Jonathan Morgenstern and Rabbi Sholom Kamenetsky  \  Mosaica Press, 2014 This book presents a basic and straightforward description of the stages beyond this world. In plain and simple language we learn more about the stages beyond this life.
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Against the Dying of the Light: A Parent's Story of Love, Loss and Hope

Against the Dying of the Light: A Parent’s Story of Love, Loss and Hope

By: Leonard Fein \ Jewish Lights Publishing, 2004 This book chronicle’s a father’s struggle to grapple with his 30 year old daughter’s sudden death.  Mr. Fein is able to take the experience of loss beyond the personal, as he finds universal meaning and hope and shares important teachings about the power of memory.
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Children's Book

Children’s Book

A children’s book about child loss that we helped produce is available to whomever would like to receive a copy.
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